Amelia Shevenell

Amelia Shevenell

Assistant Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2004
Office Phone: 727.553.3372
CV: View PDF
PaleoLab Website


Expedition Antarctica on Facebook
Amelia Shevenell on Twitter
Expedition Antarctica Website
Southern Ocean Science Website

Research: Paleoceanography/Paleoclimatology; Trace and minor elements in biogenic calcite and marine sediments; Stable isotopes in carbonate and siliceous marine microfossils; Lipid biomarkers; Sedimentology

Dr. Shevenell's research focuses on generating high-resolution geochemical records from marine sediments to address questions related to Earth's Cenozoic climate evolution. Her current research interests are geographically diverse (including the Southern Ocean and North Pacific Ocean) and divided into three focus areas: 1) Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet development from far-field and ice proximal records, 2) the role of the high-latitude oceans in Glacial-Interglacial carbon cycling, and 3) Antarctic Holocene climate variability. Paleoclimate/paleoceanographic research undertaken by the Shevenell Lab is relevant to IPCC concerns that ongoing climate changes are accelerating polar ice cap melting and global sea level rise. Shevenell and her students develop, calibrate, and employ a wide variety of inorganic and organic geochemical and micropaleontologic techniques to reconstruct past changes in ocean temperature, circulation, productivity, continental ice volume, and carbon cycling on decadal to orbital timescales. This multi-proxy approach enables Shevenell, her students, and their collaborators to address the broadest range of climate and biogeochemical problems.

Dr. Shevenell is actively involved in several international research programs, including the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) and Antarctic Geologic Drilling (ANDRILL). Dr. Shevenell maintains an active sea-going research program and encourages student participation. Field research opportunities in the Shevenell Lab range in scale, but all include the retrieval of marine sediments from continental margins and/or ocean basins using oceanographic research vessels, ice breakers, drill ships, or ice-shelf drilling platforms.

More in this category: « Brad E. Rosenheim