Geological Oceanography

Pamela Hallock Muller

Pamela Hallock Muller

Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1977
Office Phone: 727.553.1567
Email: pmuller@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
Reef Indicators Lab Website
Dr. Pamela Hallock Muller on Google Scholar


Research: Biological, Environmental and Evolutionary Controls on the Production and Accumulation of Carbonate Sediments: Geologic History of Reefs; Modern Coral Reefs; Shelf Ecology; Environmental Management; Micropaleontology; Paleoceanography; Paleoecology.

Studies of both the geologic record and modern ecosystems provide insight not only into environments of the past and present, but also the probable effects of human activities on future tropical marine ecosystems. Foraminifera are the most abundant shelled organisms in modern oceans and have a fossil record going back more than 500 million years. They are also excellent model organisms for environmental and paleoceanographic research. Ongoing projects include: a) decadal-scale changes in reef communities of the Florida Keys, b) biology and ecology of benthic foraminifera, corals and their algal symbionts, c) development of bioindicator protocols applicable to reef environments worldwide, and d) effects of ocean acidification on calcification of benthic organisms.

Professor Hallock's graduate students have come from backgrounds ranging from biology and geology to engineering and computer science; all with an interest in interdisciplinary research. Their work has implications across the geobiological spectrum including cell biology, algal symbiosis, coral-reef ecology, environmental management, global environmental change, evolution, paleoceanography, sedimentology, and hydrocarbon exploration.

In 2012, Dr. Hallock Muller was elected as a Fellow of the Paleontological Society. In 2013, Dr. Hallock Muller was chosen as one of the Top 25 Women Professors in Florida.

David F. Naar

David F. Naar

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 1990
Office Phone: 727.553.1637
Email: naar@usf.edu
CV: View PDF

 

 

Research: Marine Magnetics; Mid-Ocean Ridge and Hotspot Interactions; Plate Tectonics; Seafloor Mapping with High-Resolution Multibeam Sonars of Artificial and Real Coral Reefs, Mines, Paleoshorelines, Hydrothermal Vents, and Fish Habitats; and Wax Analog Modeling of Seafloor Spreading Processes

Deep Ocean: Mid-ocean microplate tectonics, small and large offset propagating rifts, and hydrothermal venting and other mid-ocean ridge processes.

Shallow Ocean: High-resolution multibeam studies of: 1) benthic habitats of coral reefs and fish; 2) paleoshorelines & sea level rise; 3) scour & burial of mines, artificial reefs, & pipelines; 3) shallow water hydrothermal venting, and 4) paleoshorelines.

Over the past six years, these research interests have been addressed with oceanographic seafloor mapping expeditions to the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Analyses of multibeam, magnetics, gravity, side-scan sonar are made in conjunction with insight from a seafloor spreading analog wax model. Current projects include: Plate tectonic reconstruction of the Pacific-Nazca plates, Off-axis volcanism along the Easter Seamount Chain, Deep submersible investigations of exposed oceanic crust, Benthic habitat studies of Pulley Ridge, Florida Middle Ground, and Panama City Beach. Students involved in these projects partake in data collection, data analysis and publishing results (e.g., four of the five publications listed below are first-authored by the student involved with the project).

Dr. Naar is currently serving as the Graduate Program Director for the college.

Brad E. Rosenheim

Brad E. Rosenheim

Assistant Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D. University of Miami, 2005
Office Phone: 727-553-3354
Email: brosenheim@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
Rosenheim Group Website
Brad E. Rosenheim on Twitter
Southern Ocean Science Website

 


Research: Paleoceanography/Paleoclimate, stable isotopes, carbon cycling

Research in Brad Rosenheim's group aims to constrain changes in climate and carbon cycling in the recent geologic past, from the anthropocene to the last glacial maximum. Researchers working with Dr. Rosenheim employ isotopic techniques including conventional stable isotope measurements (H, C, N, O), non-conventional stable isotope measurements ("clumped" isotopes in CO2 derived from carbonate minerals), and radioisotopic techniques including uranium system dating and radiocarbon analysis. Dr. Rosenheim's group obtains geologic and oceanographic data from sediment, coral and sclerosponge skeletons, ice, and the open ocean water column. The group casts a broad approach to specific questions regarding climate and carbon cycling, resulting in success of obtaining research support from an equivalently broad section of NSF programs and other funding agencies that fund Earth Sciences.

For up-to-date laboratory activities and a list of recent publications and news, please visit the Rosenheim lab web page.

Amelia Shevenell

Amelia Shevenell

Associate Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2004
Office Phone: 727.553.3372
Email: ashevenell@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
PaleoLab Website

 

Expedition Antarctica on Facebook
Amelia Shevenell on Twitter
Expedition Antarctica Website
Southern Ocean Science Website

Research: Paleoceanography/Paleoclimatology; Trace and minor elements in biogenic calcite and marine sediments; Stable isotopes in carbonate and siliceous marine microfossils; Lipid biomarkers; Sedimentology

Dr. Shevenell's research focuses on generating high-resolution geochemical records from marine sediments to address questions related to Earth's Cenozoic climate evolution. Her current research interests are geographically diverse (including the Southern Ocean and North Pacific Ocean) and divided into three focus areas: 1) Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet development from far-field and ice proximal records, 2) the role of the high-latitude oceans in Glacial-Interglacial carbon cycling, and 3) Antarctic Holocene climate variability. Paleoclimate/paleoceanographic research undertaken by the Shevenell Lab is relevant to IPCC concerns that ongoing climate changes are accelerating polar ice cap melting and global sea level rise. Shevenell and her students develop, calibrate, and employ a wide variety of inorganic and organic geochemical and micropaleontologic techniques to reconstruct past changes in ocean temperature, circulation, productivity, continental ice volume, and carbon cycling on decadal to orbital timescales. This multi-proxy approach enables Shevenell, her students, and their collaborators to address the broadest range of climate and biogeochemical problems.

Dr. Shevenell is actively involved in several international research programs, including the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) and Antarctic Geologic Drilling (ANDRILL). Dr. Shevenell maintains an active sea-going research program and encourages student participation. Field research opportunities in the Shevenell Lab range in scale, but all include the retrieval of marine sediments from continental margins and/or ocean basins using oceanographic research vessels, ice breakers, drill ships, or ice-shelf drilling platforms.