Retired-Emeritus

Albert C. Hine

Albert C. Hine

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Geological Oceanography
PhD, University of South Carolina-Columbia, 1975
Office Phone: 727.553.1161
Email: hine@usf.edu
CV: View PDF

 

 

Research: Carbonate Platforms and Reefs; Coastlines and Continental Shelves; Geologic History of Florida, Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean; Geology of Continental Margins; High Resolution Seismic Reflection Profiling; Phosphate Deposits; Sea Level Changes of the Geologic Past; and Seafloor Mapping and Imaging.

Dr. Hine is fundamentally a broadly-trained geological oceanographer who has addressed sedimentary geology/stratigraphy problems from the estuarine system out to the base of slope—primarily in carbonate or mixed siliciclastic/carbonate environments. He, his associates and graduate students have defined the response of coastal and shelf depositional systems to sea-level fluctuations, climate changes, western boundary currents, antecedent topography, and sediment supply. Specifically this includes geologic origin and evolution of submerged paleo-shorelines, reefs (relict and active), shelf sand bodies, open marine marsh systems, barrier islands, and back-barrier environments. Hine's primary research tools are high-resolution seismic reflection profilers, side-scan sonars, swath bathymetric systems, geoacoustic seafloor-classification systems, and ROV's. Additionally, they have used a variety of submersibles including the DSRV Alvin and Clelia.

Dr. Hine has participated in >75 research cruises including the JOIDES Resolution (Co-chief scientist—Leg 182, and sedimentologist—Leg 194). Dr. Hine won the Francis P. Shepard Medal for excellence in marine geology in 2009.

Peter R. Betzer

Peter R. Betzer

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Chemical Oceanography
Ph.D., University of Rhode Island, 1971
Email: peter@stpetepartnership.org

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.

 



Research Interests

My current research interests include defining the involvement of particulate materials in geoChemical cycles; understanding the specific ways that various classes of organisms are involved in the creation, modification and transfer of particulate material in the ocean; using Chemical and mineralogical signatures to specify the sources for and movement of particulate matter in the oceans; specifying the influence of atmospherically-derived and river-borne particulates on primary production in the open ocean; applying new analytical systems to the ocean realm such as a holographically-equipped sediment trap and a computer-assisted scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray detectors.

In the past, I have participated in numerous oceanographic expeditions, including work in the North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and, most recently, the North Pacific Ocean.

Norman J. Blake

Norman J. Blake

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Biological Oceanography
Ph.D., University of Rhode Island, 1972
Office Phone: 727.553.1521
Email: normjblake@yahoo.com

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.

 


Research Interests

The general area of research is marine invertebrate ecology. The laboratory presently focuses on aquaculture of commercially important bivalves, especially the Florida Bay Scallop. The shellfish hatchery in the college is the only hatchery in Florida dedicated to the aquaculture of bay scallops. The larvae produced are utilized by graduate students for thesis and dissertation research as well as for restoring bay scallop populations to the west coast of Florida. Other research interests involve bivalve histopathology, reproductive control mechanisms, and human health and safety issues involving marine bivalves.

 

Kendall L. Carder

Kendall L. Carder

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Ocean Optics
Ph.D., Oregon State University, 1970
Office Phone: 727.553.1521
Email: kendall.carder@sri.com
CV: View PDF

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.

 


Research Interests

I specialize in optics, radiative transfer, and remote sensing in order to ascertain various ocean properties: pigments, detritus, dissolved organic matter, shallow bathymetry, and sea grass coverage. Since as much as 90% of the visible signal collected from space is derived from the atmosphere even on relatively clear days, mathematical removal of the atmospheric effects of molecular and aerosol scatter and absorption is required in order to observe the ocean. Then, in order to assess the bottom components in shallow waters, another 80% or so of water scattering and absorption effects must be removed. To assist with model development and validation, the optical properties of the ocean and bottom are also measured. A temporal and thematic range of papers are listed below from determining particle properties and dynamics to deriving atmospheric, ocean, and bottom properties from aircraft and space. Applications to red-tide, global carbon-cycle, and heat-budget research are inherent in the themes of these papers.

Kent A. Fanning

Kent A. Fanning

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Chemical Oceanography
Ph.D., Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, 1973
Email: kaf@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
Organic Nutrient Laboratory Website

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.



Research: Marine Nutrients

Marine nutrients like dissolved nitrate or silica are the focus of Dr. Fanning's research through the Oceanic Nutrient Laboratory. The main emphasis concerns inorganic nutrients in upper ocean waters, where most oceanic photosynthesis occurs even though nutrient concentrations are often very low. The challenge is to detect changes in those concentrations as precisely as possible and then try to find explanations for the changes. Detailed surface surveys are conducted with highly sensitive nutrient measurements in patches of coastal surface waters labeled with tracers. Nutrient concentrations in these waters are usually well down into the nanomolar range. Principal nutrients under investigation are the nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium ions. Findings to date are that nitrate and nitrite in these waters show only slight variations from the averages over an annual cycle but that, in sharp contrast, ammonium ion concentrations can vary up to many-fold times higher than what appears to be normal background levels. Causes for this vastly different behavior of ammonium ion relative to the other main nitrogen-bearing inorganic nutrients are poorly known. A major part of the fieldwork is to develop a high-sensitivity nutrient sensor that will function in an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). The sensor will permit the determination of the lateral shapes of patches of coastal water with ammonium enrichments, among other things. The AUV will greatly help the search for explanations.

The Oceanic Nutrient Laboratory also conducts research concerns research on temporal trends in nutrient concentrations within permanently anoxic ocean waters. Multi-year trends are being measured in the Cariaco Basin along the Venezuelan continental margin, and those results are compared to nutrient data from the Black Sea and other anoxic regions in the ocean. The objective of this work is to understand the pathways by which anoxia can alter chemical processes in the sea.

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.

Thomas Hopkins

Thomas Hopkins

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Biological Oceanography
Ph.D., Florida State University, 1964
Email: thopkin1@tampabay.rr.com
Selected Publications: View PDF

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.

 


Research Interests

My research primarily centered on pelagic marine ecosystems and oceanic food webs. My initial work was on estuarine plankton biology, followed by a shift toward oceanic research in the Antarctic and low latitude regions such as the Gulf of Mexico. My principal focus was on the role of zooplankton in the food web. This involved studies of the feeding habits of the principal zooplanktivores in pelagic environments, e.g. mid-water fishes, shrimps and squids and the degree to which these predators impact carbon flux in the ocean.

Shortly before retirement, I was director of the USF Center For Ocean Technology, whose primary mission was development of new sensors for in situ measurements of key biological, chemical and physical variables.

Luis Garcia-Rubio

Luis Garcia-Rubio

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Chemical Oceanography
Ph. D., McMaster University, Canada, 1981
Office Phone: 727.553.1246
Email: garlop01@gmail.com
CV: View PDF

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.

 


Research Interests: Mathematical Modeling, Sensor Development and Instrumentation, Spectroscopy, Light Scattering, Remote Sensing, Microbial Detection, Micron and Sub-micron Particle Characterization

Dr. Garcia-Rubio's team focuses on sensor development for real-time continuous monitoring of biological and environmental processes with particular emphasis on quantitative characterization of micron and submicron particles. This research couples state-of-the-art analytical techniques in spectroscopy and microbiology to provide a detailed characterization of microorganisms and cells. In addition to marine bio-particles, the technology developed through this research has important applications in veterinary applications and medical diagnosis.

Quantum Leaps in Disease Detection

Joseph J. Torres

Joseph J. Torres

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Biological Oceanography
Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 1980
Office Phone: 727.553.1246
Email: jjtorres@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
Selected Publications: View PDF

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.

 


Research Interests:

My lab studies the physiology and ecology of pelagic species. We are interested in a wide variety of taxa, including the crustaceans, gelatinous organisms, and fishes, and have focused on sizes from 2 mm on up to several cm. Our main concerns lie in how open-ocean species acquire and use energy and how they have adapted to the temperatures and oxygen levels that typify their habitat. Field work takes place aboard research vessels and our sampling includes multiple opening and closing nets and blue water SCUBA diving. Many of our physiological measurements are done on board ship; shipboard measurements are complemented by a suite of bioChemical analyses that are done in our home lab. Most recently, we have been a part of the Southern Ocean Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics program (SO-GLOBEC) that is examining the overwintering strategies of the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, on the western Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf.

 

Publications since Retirement:

 

Metabolism of an Antarctic solitary coral, Flabellum impensum

Mitochondrial energetics of benthic and pelagic Antarctic teleosts

Assemblages of micronektonic fishes and invertebrates in a gradient of regional warming along the Western Antarctic Peninsula

Genetic differentiation in the ice-dependent fish Pleuragramma antarctica along the Antarctic Peninsula

Metabolism of gymnosomatous pteropods in waters of the western Antarctic Peninsula shelf during austral fall

Distribution of gymnosomatous pteropods in western Antarctic Peninsula shelf waters: influences of Southern Ocean water masses

Age, growth, and reproduction of the littlehead porgy, Calamus proridens, from the eastern Gulf of Mexico

Edward S. VanVleet

Edward S. VanVleet

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Chemical Oceanography
Ph.D., University of Rhode Island, 1978
Office Phone: 727.553.1246
Email: vanvleet@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
Selected Publications: View PDF
Marine Organic Geochemistry Laboratory Website

 

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.


Research Interests

Since coming to the University of South Florida in 1979, my research has focused mainly on the biogeoChemical cycling of natural and anthropogenic organic compounds in the marine environment. The fundamental goal of this research is to investigate how we can use these organic compounds as molecular markers to study other cycles and pathways occurring in the oceans.

Over the past several years, some specific research projects carried out in my laboratory have included the following: (1) bioChemical production, storage, and transfer of metabolic energy reserves in Antarctic mid-water food webs; (2) production and cycling of archaebacterial phytanyl ether lipids in anoxic and hypersaline oceanic systems; (3) inputs, fates, and effects of oil pollution in the marine environment; (4) use of organic biomarkers to trace inputs, dispersal and accumulation of terrestrial and urban run off; and (5) uptake and accumulation of toxic metals, hydrocarbons and pesticides by marine organisms. Although I anticipate carrying out more research in tropical-subtropical systems over the next few years, I also plan to remain involved in global programs as well. My previous research has been carried out both locally (Florida coastal waters and Gulf of Mexico) and in such other areas as the Antarctic, Italy, Mexico, Africa, and South America. In addition, cooperative programs have been carried out in Germany and China. Analytically, we are equipped with several high resolution gas chromatographs, a combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometer, an Iatroscan lipid class analyzer, and a high performance liquid chromatograph. Also available in the Department are an organic carbon analyzer, elemental (CNH) analyzer, stable isotope ratio mass spectrometer, and most other equipment necessary for full organic geoChemical work.

Gabriel A. Vargo

Gabriel A. Vargo

Retired-Emeritus, Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., Graduate School of Oceaonography, University of Rhode Island, 1976
Office Phone: 727.553.1246
Email: vargo@mail.usf.edu
Selected Publications: View PDF

* Please Note: These professors are retired and are no longer accepting new students.



Research Interests:

Phytoplankton ecology and physiology, dynamics of dinoflagellate and Harmful Algal Blooms, measurements of in situ growth rates, phytoplankton-zooplankton interactions, benthic microalgal production and biomass, benthic filter feeders related to bloom dynamics. More recently two projects are underway to assess the impact of phycotoxins on sea birds, shore birds and raptors.