Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida
Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South FloridaMarine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida
Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida
Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida
Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida

RESEARCH - VIROMICS

Lysogeny in Tampa Bay
St. Pete Pier on Tampa Bay
The factors that control the occurrence of lysogeny in the marine environment are poorly understood. To study which factors might influence the lysogenic switch in natural populations, we have performed a seasonal study of lysogeny in Tampa Bay. Biweekly sampling included analysis for inducible prophage (detection of lysogens) in both heterotrophic bacteria and marine Synechococcus, primary production, bacterial production, nutrients, chlorophyll a, and bacterial and viral direct counts.

St. Pete Pier on Tampa Bay
Temperature ranged from 15 to 20°C over the project period, and the major input of nutrients coincided with the rainfall that occurred between June and October.

The greatest occurrence of lysogeny coincided with the winter months, December through February (bottom panel in the figure above). This also coincided with the times of lowest water temperature, primary production, bacterial production, and bacterial direct counts.

A similar observation was obtained for lysogeny in Synechococcus.


Figure 2. Seasonal Variations in Cyanobacteria and Cyanophage Abundance. Click here to see a larger version of this figure.
This figure shows a spring bloom in Synechococcus counts and cyanophages, followed by a fall bloom in both. However, detectable Synechococcus lysogens were found only in the winter months (bottom panel). We interpret this to mean that lysogeny is favored during times of low resources, low host abundance and growth rate, as occurred in the winter months.

References:

McDaniel, L., L.A. Houchin, S.J. Williamson, and J.H. Paul. 2002. Lysogeny in marine Synechococcus populations. Nature 415:496

Williamson, S., L. McDaniel, L. Houchin, and J.H. Paul. 2002. Seasonal variation in lysogeny as depicted by prophage induction in Tampa Bay, Florida. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 68:4307-4314

  • To learn more about lysogeny in Tampa Bay, click here.

  • To learn more about lysogeny in marine Synechococcus, click here.

  • To learn more about the sequencing of ΦHSIC, click here.

  • To learn more about lysogeny in marine Bacillus strains, click here.

  • To learn more about modeling lytic/lysogenic interactions in the ocean, click here.


Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida
Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida
Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida
Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Copyright © 2008, University of South Florida, College of Marine Science 140 7th Avenue S., St. Petersburg, FL 33701 Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida
Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida Marine Microbiology Group - College of Marine Science - University of South Florida