Senator Bill Nelson visits USFSP for a field hearing

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - On Thursday, August 10, 2017, Senator Bill Nelson convened a field hearing by the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation in USFSP’s Student Center.  Titled “Threats Facing Florida’s Tourism Driven Economy,” the opening remarks by Senator Nelson and others on the committee brought attention to the negative impacts of human-caused disasters and a changing climate on tourism in the state of Florida, an issue which affects every resident in some facet.  Four witnesses from various industries were given time to offer their statements imploring the senator to continue to fight for legislation and funding that will have the greatest benefit on the environment and residents of Florida.  The panel of committee members then questioned the witnesses for their thoughts on how best to implement the changes needed to steward our environment and, thereby, preserve a very robust tourism industry. 

Additionally, a round table of USF professors and senate staff members was held in the morning ahead of the senate committee hearing.  Drawing on the knowledge from each of their fields of research, the faculty members made clear the scientific infrastructure that must remain intact in order to comprehend the impacts of natural and human-induced environmental challenges facing our population.  Concerns discussed included:  sea level rise and coastal structures, ports hazard management, seagrass health, clean drinking water, NASA earth observations, the importance of long-term monitoring and data collection, overfishing as the result of misguided regulation, St. Petersburg as a scientific center of excellence, and the ongoing cycle of beach erosion, renourishment and shore protection. 

Story By: Sean Beckwith

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Exploring the Deep Ocean with NOAA Professional Development Workshop

ST. PETESRBURG, FL - Join us Saturday, September 30, 2017 at 8:00am - 4:00pm for a Professional Development Workshop for Educators of Grades 6-12.

Educators are invited to join NOAA OER staff to learn more about the importance of ocean exploration, current exploration technologies, and recent deep-sea discoveries. This full day Professional Development workshop will introduce standards-based, hands-on activities and other resources that guide classroom teaching and learning. Ocean health, unique underwater habitats, underwater mapping and remotely-operated vehicles are just a few of the topics to be addressed.

To Register Click Here

View Exploring the Deep Ocean with NOAA Flyer

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Last modified on Wednesday, 09 August 2017 18:07

Rising Tides - Summer 2017

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - It's been an exciting winter here at USF College of Marine Science. Here are some of the highlights in the Rising Tides Magazine, Summer 2017 edition.

Rising Tides v7 - Summer 2017

 

Seminar Schedule Fall 2017

2017 Fall Seminar Schedule

* Fridays at 3:30 PM, MSL Conference Room, (MSL 134)
Note: Some seminars are scheduled for Thursday (3:30PM, MSL 134)

* Speakers highlighted in green have been confirmed. Speakers in black are tentative. 

 

Aug. 24, 2017

Speaker: Erica Hudson Ombres

Affiliation: NOAA

Title: NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program

Host: Don Chambers

Aug. 25, 2017

Speaker: KT Scott

Affiliation: USF Integrative Biology

Title: Surprising diversity of CO2 concentrating mechanisms in sulfur oxidizing bacteria from marine habitats and elsewhere

Host: Mya Breitbart

 

Sept. 1, 2017

Speaker: Faculty seminars

 

Sept. 8, 2017

Speaker: Aditya Nayak

Affiliation: Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Florida David Murphy, USF College of Engineering

Title: TBD

Host: David Murphy, USF College of Engineering

 

Sept. 15, 2017

Speaker: Valerie Trouet

Affiliation: University of Arizona

Title: TBD

Host: Julie Richey

 

Sept. 21, 2017

Speaker: Sandra Cruz-Pol

Affiliation: University of Puerto Rico at Mayguez

Title: TBD

Host: David Naar/Bernard Batson/Frank Muller-Karger

 

Sept. 22, 2017

Speaker: Chris Martens

Affiliation:

Title: TBD

Host: Mark Luther

 

Sept. 29, 2017

Speaker: Randy Bundy

Affiliation: University of Washington

Title: TBD

Host: Kristin Buck

 

Oct. 4, 2017

Speaker: Erin Symonds

Affiliation: Sackett Award winner

Title: TBD

Host: Mya Breitbart/David Naar

 

Oct. 13, 2017

Speaker: Todd A. Crowl

Affiliation: Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University

Title: TBD

Host: Abdiel E. Laureano-Rosario/Frank Muller-Karger

 

Oct. 20, 2017

Speaker: Chris Anastasiou

Affiliation: Southwest Florida Water Management District

Title: TBD

Host: Sean Beckwith

Oct. 27, 2017

Speaker: Rene Boiteau

Affiliation: Pacific Northwest National Lab

Title: TBD

Host: Tim Conway

 

Nov. 3, 2017

Speaker: Howard Townsend

Affiliation: NOAA Chesapeake Bay

Title:

Host: Cameron Ainsworth

 

Nov. 9, 2017

Speaker: USF Alumni Roundtable

Affiliation:

Title: TBD

Host: Howard Rutherford

 

Nov. 17, 2017

Speaker: Pete Rose

Affiliation: Rose & Associates

Title: Cognitive bias is scientific research

Host: Gene Shinn

 

Dec. 1, 2017

Speaker: Jeremy Tesla

Affiliation: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Title: TBD

Host: Yun Li

 

Dec. 8, 2017

Speaker: Peter Girguis

Affiliation: Harvard University

Title: TBD

Host: Mya Breitbart

Last modified on Tuesday, 08 August 2017 13:32

Red Tide Chek, the first hand-held device that can detect red tide in the field

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - John Paul, PhD, USF distinguished professor, is lead inventor of Red Tide Chek, the first hand-held device that can detect red tide in the field.  Red tide is one of Florida’s greatest environmental, ecological and economic threats. These harmful algal blooms can cause human health problems and hamper the economy in lost tourism dollars and damaged fisheries.

Read the full USF article

Don Chambers elected as a Fellow of the AGU

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - University of South Florida physical oceanographer Don Chambers, Professor in the College of Marine Science, has been elected as Fellow to the American Geophysical Union (AGU).  The award recognizes Chambers’ contributions to satellite geodesy that have brought new understanding of ocean and ice dynamics.

AGU is an international non-profit scientific association with more than 60,000 members dedicated to promotion and discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity.  The Fellows program recognizes AGU members who have made exceptional contributions to their fields as evaluated by their peers and vetted by section and focus group committees.  To qualify for consideration, nominees must be responsible for a major breakthrough, discovery, or paradigm shift in one of the Earth and space sciences.  The rare honor will be recognized during the Honors Ceremony at the organization’s Fall Meeting.

View AGU article here

Last modified on Friday, 28 July 2017 13:56

CMS Students on NOAA Ocean Acidification Cruise

KEY WEST, FL - USF College of Marine Science students Jon Sharp, Katelyn Schockman, and Ellie Hudson-Heck from the Byrne Lab, along with Eckerd College intern Courtney Tierney, are currently sailing aboard NOAA’s R/V Ronald H. Brown on the 2017 Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cycle Cruise (GOMECC-3). The Brown departed Key West, Florida on July 18, 2017 and will return to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on August 21, 2017, after a full loop around the Gulf of Mexico.

This is the most comprehensive ocean acidification cruise in this region to date, and the first of its kind to explore Mexican waters. Jon, Katelyn, Ellie, and Courtney are measuring pH and carbonate ion concentrations in the Gulf. These data will be vital for evaluating the progression of ocean acidification across the basin and on regional scales, with a particular focus on coastal dynamics. 

You can follow along with GOMECC-3 at the official cruise blog at gomecc3.wordpress.com or via Twitter using the hashtags #GOMECC3 and #GulfOA

Last modified on Friday, 28 July 2017 13:48

Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Kaustubh Thirumalai, Brown University

Seminar Title: Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

When: July 20, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Julie Richey

Join event on Facebook

 

Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Kaustubh Thirumalai, Brown University

Seminar Title: Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

When: July 20, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Julie Richey

Join event on Facebook

 

Last modified on Thursday, 13 July 2017 13:24

Climate and the redistribution of life in the sea

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Marine organisms are affected by increasing temperatures and by declining oxygen and pH levels associated with changes in the global climate.  Dr. Brad Seibel and fellow researchers seek to better understand how these changes affect unique as well as commercially important species in the oceans and to eventually map critical areas of depleted oxygen concentrations. 

Squids are an interesting group of organisms in that they have extremely high metabolic requirements yet they are also incredibly sensitive to oxygen concentrations in the water column because their bodies are constrained in how they are able to utilize oxygen.  They circumvent the issue by resting when at depth to decrease their metabolic rate. 

Working especially with the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas), one of Dr. Seibel’s research projects follows changes in the distribution of this species due to climate effects on temperature, oxygen and pH.  What regions of the ocean, as well as to what depth ranges these squids will migrate is of great interest.

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.marine.usf.edu/news#sigFreeId9ebf109f0f

Dosidicus gigas swims in a flow tunnel. Credit: Stephani Gordon, Open Boat Films.

 

Another project focuses on zooplankton, small organisms near the base of the food chain that feed on phytoplankton and smaller zooplankton.  These tiny organisms are more efficient than squid at extracting oxygen but also show signs of migration related to the changing climate, especially vertical migration in which they seek higher oxygen concentrations at shallower depths. 

A third project looks at black sea bass, longfin squid and spiny dogfish sharks, three commercially important species in the northeastern U.S.  Flow chambers allow researchers to measure metabolic rates while the organism is swimming against a current and while at rest in order to determine its total metabolic scope.  An optimal aerobic scope exists at a certain temperature, above which activity, growth, and reproduction will suffer.

In addition to studying specific effects on organisms, Dr. Seibel and his group plan to map areas of low oxygen, called Oxygen Minimum Zones, which they have found to occur at finer spatial scales than was previously understood. 

Last modified on Friday, 28 July 2017 13:48