Seminar Schedule Fall 2017

2017 Fall Seminar Schedule

* Fridays at 3:30 PM, MSL Conference Room, (MSL 134)
Note: Some seminars are scheduled for Thursday (3:30PM, MSL 134)

* Speakers highlighted in green have been confirmed. Speakers in black are tentative. 

 

Aug. 24, 2017

Speaker: Erica Hudson Ombres

Affiliation: NOAA

Title: NOAA’s Ocean Acidification Program

Host: Don Chambers

Aug. 25, 2017

Speaker: KT Scott

Affiliation: USF Integrative Biology

Title: Surprising diversity of CO2 concentrating mechanisms in sulfur oxidizing bacteria from marine habitats and elsewhere

Host: Mya Breitbart

 

Sept. 1, 2017

09:30 – 09:35 am Chuanmin Hu, Physical Oceanography
Introduction

09:35 – 10:05 am Brad Rosenheim, Geological Oceanography
Deciphering DOC in the Gulf of Mexico

10:05 – 10:35 am Don Chambers, Physical Oceanography
Have the fronts of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current really shifted south in the last 25 years?

10:35 – 10:45 am Coffee Break

10:45 – 11:15 am Mya Breitbart, Biological Oceanography
All about the base: DNA sequencing to address questions in biological oceanography

11:15 – 11:45 pm Ernst Peebles, Biological Oceanography
Applying DNA barcoding to synchronized egg surveys to estimate fish biomass on the West Florida Shelf

11:45 – 1:00 pm Lunch Break

01:00 – 01:30 pm Philip Kramer, FIO Director
Overview of the Florida Institute of Oceanography (FIO) and highlights of some of my recent research projects related to coral reefs, marine protected areas, and large-scale ecosystem monitoring

01:30 – 02:00 pm Steve Murawski, Biological Oceanography
Connectivity and Resilience of Gulf of Mexico Continental Shelf Fish Communities

02:00 – 02:10 am Coffee Break

02:10 – 02:40 pm Tim Conway, Chemical Oceanography
Gulf Stream Interactions and mesoscale trace element biogeochemistry

02:40 – 03:10 pm John Paul, Biological Oceanography
How to give birth to your hi-tech spinoff company

04:30 pm – Welcome-back TGIF hosted by MSAC

 

** Cancelled due to Hurricane Irma ** Sept. 8, 2017

Speaker: Aditya Nayak

Affiliation: Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, Florida David Murphy, USF College of Engineering

Title: Characterizing coastal turbulence and in situ oceanic particle fields using particle image velocimetry and digital holography

Host: David Murphy, USF College of Engineering

 

Sept. 15, 2017

Speaker: Valerie Trouet

Affiliation: University of Arizona

Title: Heat, wind, and fire: understanding drivers of past extreme weather events

Host: Julie Richey

 

Sept. 21, 2017

Speaker: Sandra Cruz-Pol

Affiliation: University of Puerto Rico at Mayguez

Professional Development Talk:
 
TITLE: RF Sensors for Remote Sensing the Earth and the importance of RF Spectrum Management

Host: David Naar/Bernard Batson/Frank Muller-Karger

 

Sept. 22, 2017

Speaker: Chris Martens

Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Title: Methane Plumes in the Deep Northern Gulf of Mexico

Host: Mark Luther

 

Sept. 29, 2017

Speaker: Randie Bundy

Affiliation: University of Washington

Title: The role of siderophores in the uptake and cycling of iron

Host: Kristin Buck

 

Oct. 5, 2017

Speaker: Erin Symonds

Affiliation: Sackett Award winner

Title: Poop and perception: A transdisciplinary approach to managing coastal microbial water quality in Costa Rica

Host: Mya Breitbart/David Naar

 

Oct. 13, 2017

Speaker: Todd A. Crowl

Affiliation: Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University

Title: FIU's CREST Center for Aquatic Chemistry and Environment:  Untangling Sources, Transport and Ecosystem Responses to Contaminants, Pollutants And Other Stressors in South Florida Aquatic Ecosystems

Host: Abdiel E. Laureano-Rosario/Frank Muller-Karger

 

Oct. 20, 2017

Speaker: Chris Anastasiou

Affiliation: Southwest Florida Water Management District

Title: "Mermaids, Manatees, and the Rising Seas:
Profound changes along Florida’s Springs Coast are shifting ecological paradigms before our very eyes!"

Host: Sean Beckwith

Oct. 27, 2017

Speaker: Rene Boiteau

Affiliation: Pacific Northwest National Lab

Title: Revealing mechanisms of biogeochemical metal cycling in the ocean

Host: Tim Conway

 

Nov. 3, 2017

Speaker: Howard Townsend

Affiliation: NOAA Chesapeake Bay

Title: Applied Ecosystem Modeling For Ecosystem-Based Fisheries Management

Host: Cameron Ainsworth

 

Nov. 9, 2017

USF Alumni Roundtable

Moderator- Merrie Beth Neely, MS '96, PhD '08
Marine Habitat Habitat Resource Specialist II, Earth Resources Technology, Inc.

Panelists-

Beau Suthard, MS ‘05
Client Program Manager, APTIM

Steve Walker, MS ‘84
Retired

Monica Wilson, MS ’07, PhD ‘13
Oil Spill Research Extension Specialist, Florida Sea Grant College Program, UF/IFAS Extension

Host: Howard Rutherford

 

Nov. 17, 2017

Speaker: Pete Rose

Affiliation: Rose & Associates

Title: Cognitive bias is scientific research

Host: Gene Shinn

 

Dec. 1, 2017

Speaker: Jeremy Testa

Affiliation: University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science

Title: Trends and Phenology in Linked Carbon, Oxygen, and Nitrogen Cycles in the Chesapeake Bay Estuary

Host: Yun Li

 

Dec. 8, 2017

Speaker: Peter Girguis

Affiliation: Harvard University

Title: The Seas We’ve Hardly Seen: Adaptations to living in the deep dark ocean

Host: Mya Breitbart

Last modified on Wednesday, 29 November 2017 17:45

Red Tide Chek, the first hand-held device that can detect red tide in the field

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - John Paul, PhD, USF distinguished professor, is lead inventor of Red Tide Chek, the first hand-held device that can detect red tide in the field.  Red tide is one of Florida’s greatest environmental, ecological and economic threats. These harmful algal blooms can cause human health problems and hamper the economy in lost tourism dollars and damaged fisheries.

Read the full USF article

Listen to the radio interview

Last modified on Tuesday, 22 August 2017 18:32

Don Chambers elected as a Fellow of the AGU

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - University of South Florida physical oceanographer Don Chambers, Professor in the College of Marine Science, has been elected as Fellow to the American Geophysical Union (AGU).  The award recognizes Chambers’ contributions to satellite geodesy that have brought new understanding of ocean and ice dynamics.

AGU is an international non-profit scientific association with more than 60,000 members dedicated to promotion and discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity.  The Fellows program recognizes AGU members who have made exceptional contributions to their fields as evaluated by their peers and vetted by section and focus group committees.  To qualify for consideration, nominees must be responsible for a major breakthrough, discovery, or paradigm shift in one of the Earth and space sciences.  The rare honor will be recognized during the Honors Ceremony at the organization’s Fall Meeting.

View AGU article here

Last modified on Friday, 28 July 2017 13:56

CMS Students on NOAA Ocean Acidification Cruise

KEY WEST, FL - USF College of Marine Science students Jon Sharp, Katelyn Schockman, and Ellie Hudson-Heck from the Byrne Lab, along with Eckerd College intern Courtney Tierney, are currently sailing aboard NOAA’s R/V Ronald H. Brown on the 2017 Gulf of Mexico Ecosystems and Carbon Cycle Cruise (GOMECC-3). The Brown departed Key West, Florida on July 18, 2017 and will return to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida on August 21, 2017, after a full loop around the Gulf of Mexico.

This is the most comprehensive ocean acidification cruise in this region to date, and the first of its kind to explore Mexican waters. Jon, Katelyn, Ellie, and Courtney are measuring pH and carbonate ion concentrations in the Gulf. These data will be vital for evaluating the progression of ocean acidification across the basin and on regional scales, with a particular focus on coastal dynamics. 

You can follow along with GOMECC-3 at the official cruise blog at gomecc3.wordpress.com or via Twitter using the hashtags #GOMECC3 and #GulfOA

Last modified on Friday, 28 July 2017 13:48

Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Kaustubh Thirumalai, Brown University

Seminar Title: Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

When: July 20, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Julie Richey

Join event on Facebook

 

Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speakers/Affiliations: Kaustubh Thirumalai, Brown University

Seminar Title: Extreme temperatures in southeast Asia caused by El Niño and worsened by global warming

When: July 20, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Julie Richey

Join event on Facebook

 

Last modified on Thursday, 13 July 2017 13:24

Climate and the redistribution of life in the sea

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Marine organisms are affected by increasing temperatures and by declining oxygen and pH levels associated with changes in the global climate.  Dr. Brad Seibel and fellow researchers seek to better understand how these changes affect unique as well as commercially important species in the oceans and to eventually map critical areas of depleted oxygen concentrations. 

Squids are an interesting group of organisms in that they have extremely high metabolic requirements yet they are also incredibly sensitive to oxygen concentrations in the water column because their bodies are constrained in how they are able to utilize oxygen.  They circumvent the issue by resting when at depth to decrease their metabolic rate. 

Working especially with the jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas), one of Dr. Seibel’s research projects follows changes in the distribution of this species due to climate effects on temperature, oxygen and pH.  What regions of the ocean, as well as to what depth ranges these squids will migrate is of great interest.

View the embedded image gallery online at:
http://www.marine.usf.edu/news?start=56#sigFreeId9ebf109f0f

Dosidicus gigas swims in a flow tunnel. Credit: Stephani Gordon, Open Boat Films.

 

Another project focuses on zooplankton, small organisms near the base of the food chain that feed on phytoplankton and smaller zooplankton.  These tiny organisms are more efficient than squid at extracting oxygen but also show signs of migration related to the changing climate, especially vertical migration in which they seek higher oxygen concentrations at shallower depths. 

A third project looks at black sea bass, longfin squid and spiny dogfish sharks, three commercially important species in the northeastern U.S.  Flow chambers allow researchers to measure metabolic rates while the organism is swimming against a current and while at rest in order to determine its total metabolic scope.  An optimal aerobic scope exists at a certain temperature, above which activity, growth, and reproduction will suffer.

In addition to studying specific effects on organisms, Dr. Seibel and his group plan to map areas of low oxygen, called Oxygen Minimum Zones, which they have found to occur at finer spatial scales than was previously understood. 

Last modified on Friday, 28 July 2017 13:48

Oceanography Camp for Girls 2017

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - The Oceanography Camp for Girls, which held its 25th anniversary last year, has just graduated another class of aspiring scientists and environmentally conscious thinkers.  The three-week camp teaches girls about science by having them be the scientist.  Hands-on work in the field and laboratory, as well as a strong focus on careers, gives participants a holistic view of what it means to be a scientist and what a future STEM career might look like.  Under the leadership of Dr. Teresa Greely and Dr. Angela Lodge and the teaching and mentoring of the graduate students of the College of Marine Science (CMS), the girls learn the social and technical aspects of working in science. 

Faculty members and researchers of CMS and scientists from the community fulfilled additional teaching roles and provided the girls further career insight.  Field excursions included Fort Desoto, Shell Key, Caladesi Island, Clam Bayou, Sea World and a research cruise aboard the R/V Angari.  Laboratory rotations throughout CMS demonstrated concepts from microbiology, advanced microscopy, seawater analysis, satellite remote sensing, fish physiology, marine medical services, ROV techniques, beach profiling, and geological sedimentary analysis.  The scientists put an exclamation on their camp experience with presentations of their projects at a ceremony held in FWC-FWRI’s Karen A. Steidinger Auditorium.  

Last modified on Wednesday, 05 July 2017 15:07

Tampa Bay Marine Science Networking Happy Hour Event June 28 2017

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Our next Tampa Bay Area Marine Science Networking Happy Hour will be on Wednesday, June 28th 2017 at 4:30-6:30pm at newly opened Lolita's Urban Wine Market located at 16 18th Street S. St Petersburg, FL 33712.  The event is self pay and name tags will be provided. You can park on the street or in the stadium overflow lot across from the market beneath the interstate which is not patrolled since it is not a Ray's game night.  They have wine (as the name suggests) - But they also have beer from all 7 of the local breweries. In addition they have amazing chacuterie.  Their Wednesday wine specials are $5 per glass.

***SPECIAL FREEBIES FOR ANY GARDENERS ATTENDING***

Find a potential employer or collaborator, a new grad student, a new major professor - or just meet other science professionals outside your office, because networking is not just for when you are not working. Please share this notice and join us and bring your ocean science professional friends and colleagues.

Join the event on Facebook

Last modified on Wednesday, 28 June 2017 11:53

Lee Kump, USF/DMS CMS PhD named Dean of College of Earth and Mineral Sciences at Penn State

UNIVERSITY PARK, PA - Lee Kump, a University faculty member and leading paleoclimatologist, has been named the new dean of Penn State’s College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, pending approval of the Penn State Board of Trustees on July 21. Kump will serve as interim dean from June 1 to July 20.

Dr. Kump has been the department head in the Department of Geosciences at Penn State, where he's been since he left USF.

Read full article here

Last modified on Tuesday, 27 June 2017 16:31