Sources and Reactivity of Terrestrial Organic Carbon

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speaker: Katie Schreiner

Affiliation: Large Lakes Observatory at the University of Minnesota Duluth

Seminar Title: Sources and Reactivity of Terrestrial Organic Carbon to the Colville River Delta, Beaufort Sea, Alaska

When: Feb. 10, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Brad E. Rosenheim

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Last modified on Tuesday, 07 February 2017 18:42

Downscaling Simulation of Oceanic Responses to Climate Change

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speaker: Changsheng Chen

Affiliation: Univ. of Massachusetts - Dartmouth

Seminar Title: Downscaling Simulation of Oceanic Responses to Climate Change: A Global-Basin-Coastal-Estuarine Resolving FVCOM System

When: Feb. 3, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Chuanmin Hu

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Developing the Capacity to Generate Coastal and Shallow‐Water Basemaps for Tropical Island Nations and Territories of the Pacific

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the University of South Florida College of Marine Science, through Dr. Frank Muller-Karger, has partnered with researchers at the University of Fiji to map coral reefs at two study sites in Fiji using satellite imagery, field surveys, and local knowledge from the native Fijian villagers who have used the resources of these habitats for centuries. In addition to creating high-resolution benthic habitat maps, the purpose of this project is to train Fijian researchers to conduct reef-monitoring research and build their capacity to carry out long-term habitat conservation goals. During the summer of 2016, USF Ph.D. candidate Matt McCarthy traveled to Fiji for 4 weeks to train Fijian personnel in reef-assessment field work and satellite-imagery mapping. The on-going project should establish a baseline from which future monitoring may be done to evaluate changes in Fijian reefs, and help guide management of these vital resources.

Two CMS researchers to participate on IODP Expedition 374 to the Ross Sea, Antarctica

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - CMS Ph.D student Imogen Browne and CMS Assistant Professor Amelia Shevenell have been selected to sail on International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 374 to the Ross Sea, Antarctica in early 2018. The two month expedition will drill sites in the Ross Sea that will enable a better understanding of the evolution of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet over the last 20 million years. Reconstructing ice sheet response during past warm climates is critical for modeling and predicting future ice sheet response and global sea level rise. This expedition was first proposed by Shevenell and her collaborators in 2012, following a workshop at USF CMS. Both Browne and Shevenell will sail as two of the ten Americans in the 35 member international science party.

The two month expedition aboard the D/V Joides Resolution, will leave from Wellington, New Zealand in January of 2018. Browne will sail as a Physical Properties specialist and Shevenell will lead a team of eight Sedimentologists. Post cruise, the two will conduct geochemical analyses of the recovered sediments to understand the role of ocean temperatures in West Antarctic Ice Sheet evolution

Last modified on Thursday, 26 January 2017 22:14

Heat Balance and Temperature Variability in the Northeast US Coastal Ocean

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speaker: Ke Chen

Affiliation: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Seminar Title: Heat Balance and Temperature Variability in the Northeast US Coastal Ocean

When: Jan. 27, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Yun Li

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Last modified on Tuesday, 07 February 2017 18:32

Florida Sea Grant College Program Overview

ST. PETERSBURG, FL -

Speaker: Karl Havens

Affiliation: University of Florida/Florida Sea Grant

Seminar Title: Florida Sea Grant College Program Overview

When: Jan. 20, 2017 3:30pm EST

Where: MSL Conference Room (134)

Host: Philip Kramer (FIO)

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Last modified on Tuesday, 17 January 2017 11:23

Graduate Student Symposium

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - The annual Graduate Student Symposium is tomorrow January 13, 2017, starting in the MSL Conference Room. Come see the next generation of marine scientists present their exciting research endeavors.

The symposium will start at 9:15 am and conclude with awards and raffle prizes during TGIF at 4:30 pm. The final schedule is attached for your convenience. For every feedback form an audience member fills out for a presentation, he or she will receive one raffle ticket in the raffle drawing. So, even if you're not presenting, if you attend the entire symposium you could have up to 23 chances to win! We'll send your feedback back to the participants anonymously after the symposium so that they can try to improve their presentation skills.

Also, if you have any suggestions for next year's symposium after you've attended, a separate evaluation form can be filled out by following this link: http://bit.ly/2j5VajR

Breakfast and lunch will also be provided from Publix, Kahwa Coffee, and The Campus Grind. Although we planned on a large number of people, please keep in mind that the food is first come, first serve.

Additionally, the final abstract booklet is attached, so feel free to browse through the presentation subjects ahead time.

Hope to sea you all there! 

2017 GSS Abstract Booklet

2017 GSS Schedule

 

 

Last modified on Thursday, 12 January 2017 22:22

Marine Science Happy Hour Networking - Jan. 11 2017

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - Our next Tampa Bay Area Marine Science Networking Happy Hour will be this Wednesday, January 11, 2017, 4:30-6:30pm at Angelo's Bar and Grill 536 1st Ave N, St. Petersburg, FL 33701!  The event is self pay, they have great happy hour specials on beer, liquor, and wine - and as always there are soft drinks.  Park on the street and name tags will be provided.  This is our first event in 2017 - kickoff the year with some networking - Find a potential employer/employee or a collaborator, a new grad student, a new major professor - or just meet other science professionals outside your office, because networking is not just for when you are NOT WORKING. Please share this notice and join us - and bring your ocean science professional friends and colleagues!

Last modified on Tuesday, 21 February 2017 18:21

Seminar Schedule Spring 2017

2017 Spring Tentative Seminar Schedule

* Fridays at 3:30 PM, MSL Conference Room, (MSL 134)
Note: Some seminars are scheduled for Thursday (3:30PM, MSL 134)

 

Jan. 13, 2017

Graduate Student Symposium

 

Jan. 20, 2017

Speaker: Karl Havens

Affiliation: University of Florida/Florida Sea Grant

Title: Florida Sea Grant College Program Overview

Host: Philip Kramer (FIO)

Jan. 27, 2017

Speaker: Ke Chen

Affiliation: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Title: Heat Balance and Temperature Variability in the Northeast US Coastal Ocean

Host: Yun Li

 

Feb. 3, 2017

Speaker: Changsheng Chen

Affiliation: Univ. of Massachusetts - Dartmouth

Title: Downscaling Simulation of Oceanic Responses to Climate Change: A Global-Basin-Coastal-Estuarine Resolving FVCOM System

Host: Chuanmin Hu

 

Feb. 10, 2017

Speaker: Katie Schreiner

Affiliation: Large Lakes Observatory at the University of Minnesota Duluth

Title: Sources and Reactivity of Terrestrial Organic Carbon to the Colville River Delta, Beaufort Sea, Alaska

Host: Brad E. Rosenheim

 

Feb. 13, 2017

Speaker: Greg Johnson (note: special date, same time as usual)

Affiliation: NOAA PMEL

Title: Improving Estimates of Earth’s Energy Imbalance

Host: Don Chambers

 

Feb. 14, 2017

Speaker: Luanne Thompson (note: special date, same time as usual)

Affiliation: University of Washington

Title: Linkages between the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, the Gulf Stream and the Atmosphere: circulation, heat content and air-sea interaction

Host: Amelia Shevenell

 

Feb. 20, 2017

Speaker/Affiliations: Masanobu Yamamoto (Hokkaido University) & Leonid Polyak (Byrd Polar Research Center, the Ohio State University)

Title: Detection of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation and tropical storm activity during the last 2900 years using Beppu Bay anoxic sediment cores

Host: Brad E. Rosenheim

 

Feb. 21, 2017

Speaker/Affiliation: Angela Rosenberg, President, ANGARI Foundation, Inc.

Title: Announcing ANGARI: A New and Innovative Platform for Ocean Research and Public Outreach

Host: Mark E. Luther

 

Feb. 23, 2017

Speaker: Alan Blumberg

Affiliation: Stevens Institute of Technology

Title: Coastal and Operational Forecasting Research at The Davidson Laboratory

Host: Robert Weisberg

 

Mar. 2, 2017

Speaker: Joel Fodrie

Affiliation: UNC Chapel-Hill

Title: Has warming, oil pollution, and fishing dramatically altered coastal ecosystems in the northern Gulf of Mexico?

Host: Chris Stallings

 

Mar. 9, 2017

Speaker: Kiho Kim 

Affiliation: American University

Title: Nitrogen Dynamics in Tropical Coastal Ecosystems: A Case Study in Guam

Host: Chris Simoniello

Mar. 24 2017

Speaker: Andreas Thurnherr

Affiliation: Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory/Columbia University

Title: Vertical Kinetic Energy, Turbulence and Mixing in the Ocean

Host: Xinfeng Liang

 

Mar. 27 2017

Speaker: Peter Hamilton

Affiliation: NC State University

Title: Recent Gulf of Mexico Loop Current studies performed by BOEM

Host: Robert Weisberg

 

Mar. 30 2017

Speaker: Stephani Gordon

Affiliation: Open Boat Films, LLC

Title: Science Communication in the current landscape- a filmmakers perspective

Host: Brad Seibel

 

Apr. 6-7 2017

Eminent Scholars Lecture Series

 

Apr. 21 2017

Speaker: Allison K. Smith

Affiliation: Univ. Washington

Title: Projections of climate driven changes on blood oxygen affinity in pelagic habitats

Host: Brad Seibel

 

Apr. 28, 2017

Speaker: Lisa Beal

Affiliation: Univ. of Miami, RSMAS

Title: Broadening not strengthening of the Agulhas Current since the early 1990’s

Host: Mark Luther

Last modified on Monday, 07 August 2017 15:01

USF's Steven Murawski and team to receive $1 Million Grant from National Academies' Gulf Research Program

ST. PETERSBURG, FL - A research team led by University of South Florida College of Marine Science professor Dr. Steven Murawski has been awarded a $1 million grant to explore how oil spills, such as the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) in 2010, impact the economic, ecological and social system aspects of fishing communities.

The Gulf Research Program (GRP) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine announced Thursday a total of $2.1 million in grants.  Murawski’s team, which also includes Dr. Claire Paris, a bio-physical modeler from the University of Miami, and an environmental science and policy expert Dr. James Sanchirico from the University of California, will receive the grant funding over two years.

“We are deeply appreciative of the grant by the Gulf Research Program of the National Academies to pursue this important research.  Our team represents expertise in biology, economics and oceanography and will provide information relevant to assess these real-world problems,” said Murawski.

The DWH spill released approximately two million barrels of oil into the water, resulting in significant impacts on coastal communities, especially in the western and northern Gulf, where many towns are co-dependent on both commercial fishing and the petroleum industries. Concern for the integrity and safety of the seafood supply during the DWH spill resulted in large-scale fishery closures, causing fishers to either travel long distances from ports to reach open grounds or re-locate to other ports adjacent to open fishing areas.

Using high-resolution, fishery-dependent datasets, Murawski’s multidisciplinary team will identify how individual communities were affected by the DWH spill, specifically those communities in coastal Florida, Alabama, Mississippi and Alabama. Working with key fisheries stakeholders and local decision makers, the team plans to identify adaptive strategies that communities could use to mitigate the effects of future oil spills. This project has the potential to transform disaster planning and fisheries management responses to such disasters in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere.

All three Gulf Research Program grants awarded Thursday support projects that will generate new insights, address critical questions, or lead to new approaches to interpreting data by bringing together concepts and methods from different disciplines. The grants also advance study design, tools, models and technologies for assessing human exposure to environmental contaminants, including acute or chronic exposures related to oil spills and other sudden and large-scale environmental disasters, and related impacts on individuals and populations.

“We’re pleased to support innovative scientific syntheses that can help us better understand the interdisciplinary challenges coastal communities face,” said Evonne Tang, GRP's director of external funding opportunities. “The new tools and products that the project teams develop would make existing data usable for stakeholders and decision makers.” The proposals were selected after an external peer-review process. These awards are part of a broad portfolio of GRP funding opportunities outlined at http://www.national-academies.org/gulf/grants.

The Gulf Research Program of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine was established in 2013 as a result of the DWH oil spill. It seeks to improve understanding of the interconnecting human, environmental, and energy systems of the Gulf of Mexico and other U.S. outer continental shelf areas. The program funds studies, projects, and other activities using three broad approaches: research and development, education and training, and environmental monitoring.

The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine are private, nonprofit institutions that provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions related to science, technology, and medicine. The Academies operate under an 1863 congressional charter to the National Academy of Sciences, signed by President Lincoln.

The University of South Florida is a high-impact, global research university dedicated to student success. USF is a Top 25 research university among public institutions nationwide in total research expenditures, according to the National Science Foundation. Serving over 48,000 students, the USF System has an annual budget of $1.6 billion and an annual economic impact of $4.4 billion. USF is a member of the American Athletic Conference.

Last modified on Friday, 16 December 2016 14:31