Prospective Student

Doctoral Degree Requirements

The following are the minimum requirements necessary to graduate from the University of South Florida with a degree in Marine Science.

Concentrations are available in:

Biological Oceanography

Chemical Oceanography

Geological Oceanography

Physical Oceanography

Marine Resource Assessment

 

Doctoral Degree (Ph. D.) in Marine Science

(Biological, Chemical, Geological, and Physical Concentrations)

  1. 90 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree (course catalog)
  • 12 core class credits - 4 core classes, 3 credit hours per class (Physical, Chemical, Biological and Geological Oceanography). A grade of "B-" or better in each of the core classes is required.
  • 62 elective credits
  • 16 dissertation credits (OCE 7980)
  • Please note only 3 credit hours of science education courses can be used towards your degree requirements.

2. Passing performance on a comprehensive qualifying written and oral examination

3. A written dissertation and successful oral defense

 

Marine Resource Assessment Concentration

  1. 90 semester hours beyond the baccalaureate degree (course catalog)
  • 12 core class credits (4 core classes, 3 credit hours per class (Physical, Chemical, Biological and Geological Oceanography). A grade of "B-" or better in each of the core classes is required.
  • 9 MRA concentration credits - 3 of the 4 MRA courses (Population Dynamics, Fish Biology, Dynamics of Marine Ecosystems, Applied Multivariate Statistics)
  • 53 elective credits16 dissertation credits (OCE 7980)
  • Please note only 3 credit hours of science education courses can be used towards your degree requirements.

2. Passing performance on a comprehensive qualifying written and oral examination

3. A written dissertation and successful oral defense

  • Thesis/dissertation topic selection: 1) must be science-based 2) should have an application to marine resource management or policy development 3) should not directly make management or policy recommendations 4) should be identified near the onset of graduate work 5) should address priorities identified by marine resource management agencies (Florida Fish & Wildlife Research Institute, National Marine Fisheries Service, US Geological Survey)

Refer to the Policies webpage for a detailed PhD Program Checklist.

These requirements complement the USF Graduate School requirements stated in the graduate catalog. Prospective students may obtain general university information visiting the USF website and the USF Graduate School website.

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Certificate

Last modified on Wednesday, 21 March 2018 17:23

Overview

We offer MS and PhD degrees and are committed to providing one of the highest quality graduate programs in the country. At the same time we are always looking for opportunities to enhance the undergraduate mission of the university. We have a strong Education and Outreach program that reaches many secondary school age children in our region. We are also looking to expand certificate opportunities for working professionals in our area and beyond.

View our Degree Programs and Curriculum

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Admissions

 

Graduate Program Admissions

We recruit graduate students from our region, across our nation and around the world. We are committed to maintaining a diverse and highly qualified graduate student population and enabling their success. Our program is a mentored one in which students work closely with their faculty advisors as apprentices. This is demanding of our faculty members' time, but upon graduation our students are fully prepared for a successful entry into our field. For questions regarding the application process, please visit our FAQ page or email marinesciences@usf.edu.

 

Who is Welcome at CMS?

We welcome anyone who has a passion for the oceans and for science, who values different perspectives, and who cherishes the opportunity to think critically and promote dialogue about the knowledge we create and disseminate. Regardless of what you look like, what you believe, or where you come from, we want to include you in our college if this description fits you.

 

Important Deadlines

Fall Admissions Priority Deadline: January 10th

Fall Admissions Final Deadline: January 15th

Spring Admissions Final Deadline: October 1st  

International Student Fall Admissions Deadline: January 2nd

International Student Spring Admissions Deadline: June 1st

 

How to Apply

The following materials must be received by the final deadline in order for the application to be considered complete. For the best opportunity to receive funding from the College, please apply by the Priority Deadline.

 

Submit Online Application

Complete the Online Application (https://secure.vzcollegeapp.com/usf/default.aspx). There is a $30.00 application fee required. The fee must be paid before your application can be seen by the Admissions Committee. A fee waiver may be requested if you qualify by being part of one of the programs listed on the fee waiver request form (http://www.usf.edu/admissions/documents/app-fee-waiver.pdf ). Please email the waiver form directly to marinescience@usf.edu, if you qualify. Please note that the College of Marine Science is part of USF Tampa and not part of USF St. Petersburg even though we are located in St. Petersburg. You must select the Tampa campus for apply for our degree programs.

 

Research Interest Essay

Use this linked MS Word template to create your essay and upload it in the “Essay” section of the Admissions Application.

 

Resume or CV

Upload your most current resume or CV in the “Resume” section of the Admissions Application

 

Transcripts

Unofficial transcripts from all institutions of higher learning that you attended must be uploaded in your Admissions Application. Once you have been admitted to the College, you will need to send your final, official transcripts to the Office of Admissions before registering for classes. If you have attended USF as a degree-seeking student, you do not have to submit your USF transcript.

Mail all transcripts to:

Office of Admissions

4202 E. Fowler Avenue, SVC 1036

Tampa, FL 33620, USA 

 

Letters of Recommendation

Applicants are required to provide three letters of recommendation as part of the admissions application. The applicant will be asked to enter in the contact information of each recommender as part of the Admissions Application. Each recommender will receive an email with a link to the recommendation upload site. At this site, the recommender can then type in the recommendation letter or attached a .doc or .pdf file. Alternatively, recommendation letters can also be emailed directly to marinescience@usf.edu. The letters should address the “Admissions Committee.” It is preferred to have letters printed on university or company letterhead in .pdf format, attached and email from a professional email address if applicable.

 

Graduate Record Exam Scores (GRE-verbal/quantitative)

The GRE is a standardized test that measures verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, critical thinking and analytical writing skills that are not related to any specific field of study. Contact ETS at www.ets.org to find a testing location and have your scores sent electronically from ETS to USF. The institution code for USF is 5828. The competitive minimum scores are as follows:

Verbal = 153 and Quantitative = 148. For the MRA concentration the minimum preferred scores are Verbal = 156 and Quantitative = 155.

 

TOEFL exam scores (For non-native English speakers)

Applicants whose native language is not English or who have not earned a degree in the United States mist also submit TOEFL scores earned within two years of the desired term of entry. A minimum total score of 79 in the internet-based test, 213 on the computer-based test, or 550 on the paper-based test are required. Applications submitted with TOEFL scores that do not meet the minimum requirements will be denied with no exceptions. Contact ETS at www.ets.org to find a testing location and have your scores sent electronically from ETS to USF. The institution code for USF is 5828. The TOEFL requirement may be waived if the applicant meets one of the following conditions:

  • Has scored 153 or higher on the GRE verbal test
  • Has earned a college degree at a U.S. institution of higher learning
  • Has earned a college degree from an institution whose language of instruction is English (must be noted on the transcript)
  • Has scored a 6.5 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS)

 

International Applicants                 

Upload the Financial Support Requirements Form to the online application. This form is available on the Admissions Application. You may also visit the USF Graduate Admissions website for more helpful information for international applicants. All international transcripts must be in English; it is the applicant’s responsibility to have foreign transcripts translated and evaluated before submitting them as part of their graduate application. Please visit the Foreign Transcript Evaluations Services Listing of evaluators.

 

Visiting the College of Marine Science                      

Please contact marinescience@usf.edu to schedule a visit to the College of Marine Science. General admissions advising can take place as well as a tour of the College and the adjacent USF St. Petersburg campus. Please note that the tours do not include visits to the laboratories or meetings with individual faculty members. These meetings should be set-up by directly contacting the faculty member of interest.

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Student Funding

USF College of Marine Science 2016 Fellowships

Student Funding

Our college has a variety of fellowships and assistantships specifically for new incoming students which typically fund 70-90% of our new students. All new applicants are automatically considered for first year college funding. On average, the pay for master's students is $21,000 and $23,000 for PhD students annually (fall, spring, summer). Fellowships and Assistantships normally include a tuition waiver or payment (covering approximately 80-100% of your total tuition expenses) and subsidized health insurance premiums.  

 

Graduate Assistantships

There are a number of Graduate Research and Teaching Assistantship positions available to new and current students. Please review our Graduate Assistantships web page for more details:

Graduate Assistantships

 

Fellowships

The University of South Florida has Fellowships that incoming students can apply for during their senior year of undergraduate study. Information regarding these Fellowships can be found here (http://www.grad.usf.edu/scholarships.php).  Incoming and existing students may also apply for the College of Marine Science Endowed Fellowships in January.  Information regarding these fellowships can be found here:(CMS Endowed Fellowships).  In addition, the top four students entering the College of Marine Science, are awarded four endowed Von Rosenstiel Fellowships, which provides a full year of stipends, tuition waivers, and a $2000 expense account to assist with their educational/research expenses.  Additional details regarding funding and application deadlines, including underrepresented minority funding from NSF, the McKnight Foundation (deadline January 15), and the Sloan Foundation, can be obtained by sending an email to: marinescience@usf.edu.

 

Federal Financial Aid

Information about Federal and State sponsored student loans can be obtained from the
Financial Aid Services department on the Tampa campus (Phone:813-974-4700 ). Please review the following web page for more details:

Financial Aid Services Department

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Program Faculty

Our faculty members are much more than researchers and teachers. We provide expert guidance at all levels, local to global, in our areas of expertise. We advise decision makers on ocean-related issues from fisheries management to sea level rise flooding risks to ocean acidification impacts on coral reefs. We are involved in setting the research agenda at every level. We are very proud of the good citizenship demonstrated by our faculty members.

 

Faculty Directory: http://www.marine.usf.edu/faculty/find-faculty

Faculty Publications: http://scholarcommons.usf.edu/msc_facpub/

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Degree Programs and Curriculum

We offer Masters and PhD degrees and are committed to providing one of the highest quality graduate programs in the country. At the same time we are always looking for opportunities to enhance the undergraduate mission of the university. We have a strong Education and Outreach program that reaches many secondary school age children in our region. We are also looking to expand certificate opportunities for working professionals in our area and beyond.

Oceanography, the study of all aspects of the oceans, is a very complex discipline, and many terms have been applied to describe its components. Marine Science is considered a synonym for Oceanography, and so our college is called the USF College of Marine Science, or CMS.

The fundamental concepts of Oceanography have been divided into four groups that, taken together, apply to or cover all of the major processes within the oceans. Not surprisingly, the four groups are aligned with four major academic sciences: physics, chemistry, biology, and geology. The concentration in Marine Resource Assessment focuses on biology and aspects of the other three sciences.

Master of Science (M.S) in Marine Science

Doctoral Degree (Ph. D.) in Marine Science

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Biological Oceanography

Biological oceanography seeks to understand the life histories and population dynamics of marine organisms and how they interact with their environment over space and time. Scientists in the College of Marine Science study the full breadth of biological oceanography including microbiology, phytoplankton, zooplankton, benthos, coral reefs, fishes, and marine mammals. Our biological oceanographers utilize a variety of techniques including SCUBA, shipboard samplers, acoustics, molecular biology, and mathematical modeling to understand the oceans and their inhabitants.

Scientists in our college also use the latest in remote sensing technology to study vast regions of the Earth's oceans, and have also developed new technology, such as genosensor capable of identifying and quantifying harmful algal blooms and related processes on unprecedented scales. 

 

For More Information

Please visit the following link for information about our Biological Oceanography research and for instructions on how to apply to our Master's or PhD program.

 

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Chemical Oceanography

Chemical oceanographers seek to understand the ways in which various elements are cycled within the oceans, and the reactions that these elements undergo. Ocean chemists improve our understanding of the basic conditions under which ocean life thrives in seawater, and help predict the effects of anthropogenic and natural climate change on ocean composition.

Research programs in the College of Marine Science include such wide ranging topics as the role and variability of nutrients in seawater, the distribution and cycling of rare earth elements and other trace metals, examination of the oceans' CO2 system, the study of dissolved organic matter, molecular organic compounds, radionuclides and stable isotopes in the oceans, and the distribution of chemical pollutants and their toxicity on marine organisms and ecosystems. Faculty and students utilize a wide variety of state-of-the art instrumentation and technology for investigating these research problems.

 

For More Information

Please visit the following link for information about our Chemical Oceanography research and for instructions on how to apply to our Master's or PhD program.

Last modified on Wednesday, 21 March 2018 13:51

Geological Oceanography

Geological oceanographers in the College of Marine Science conduct research from the continental margins to the deep-ocean seafloor extending in time from modern environments to millions of years back in Earth's history to understand and predict Earth surface and interior processes. Primary research themes include: (1) paleoceanography and paleoclimatology; (2) coastline and continental shelf development and processes including effects of storms and sea-level fluctuations; (3) the health of modern and recent geologic history of coral reefs and carbonate depositional environments; (4) anthropogenic influences on estuaries; (5) mathematical explanations of geologic phenomena; and (6) plate tectonics. Our geological oceanography group has a variety of modern well-equipped laboratories and field equipment, including one of the best seafloor mapping capabilities in the US. Fully integrated with these field instruments is the computational capability to generate state-of-the art data depictions and imagery.

Our group also works closely with scientists from the US Geological Survey's Center for Coastal and Marine Science Center, a major federal laboratory located nearby.

 

For more information

Please visit the following link for information about our Geological Oceanography research and for instructions on how to apply to our Master's or PhD program.

Last modified on Wednesday, 21 March 2018 13:51

Physical Oceanography

Physical oceanography involves the study of water movement in the ocean. Energy is introduced to the ocean through wind and solar heating, and these combine with the rotation of the Earth and gravitational effects to drive ocean circulation, tides, and waves. Our physical oceanographers also investigate how the Earth's oceans are directly coupled with the atmosphere, from local weather patterns to the global climate system. Physical oceanographers in the CMS carry out research on a variety of topics using the latest technology. Computer models, real time data, satellite remote sensing, and in situ data from moored arrays, coastal and island tide gauges, and research cruises are used to study a wide range of research problems. Topics include tide and current prediction in Tampa Bay, circulation on the West Florida Shelf and in the Gulf of Mexico, El Niño, and the potential for global climate change.

Research at the College of Marine Science has received national recognition. We are a member of the National Association of Marine Laboratories. Project funding for physical oceanography comes from a variety of sources including the National Ocean Service, the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

 

Our Resources

Our Physical Oceanographers utilize computer resources, modeling, bouys, COMPS and PORTS real time sensors, and satellite data received at USF.

 

For More Information

Please visit the following link for information about our Chemical Oceanography research and for instructions on how to apply to our Master's or PhD program.

Last modified on Wednesday, 21 March 2018 13:51

Marine Resource Assessment

The College of Marine Science offers an interdisciplinary concentration in Marine Resource Assessment (MRA) as part of its M.S. and Ph.D. programs. This concentration provides training in the emerging field of fisheries science and ecosystem-based management. Its mission is to train a new generation of scientists that can effectively address issues concerning the sustainability of the world's living natural resources.

Kara Wall

Students with concentrations in MRA will be expected to engage in thesis or dissertation topics that deal directly with interactions between living resources and anthropogenic- or climate-driven factors, including subjects such as bio-physical interactions, changing predator-prey relationships, over fishing, and identification of essential linkages that determine habitat quality. It is expected that students who select the MRA concentration will interact strongly with one or more of the state and federal resource-management agencies that are located near the College of Marine Science in St. Petersburg, including the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Regional Office, and the Florida Integrated Science Center of the US Geological Survey. These agencies, all within one mile from the campus, represent a collective wealth of knowledge, expertise, and practical experience and will serve as vital assets to the new concentration and its students.

Student Enrollment

The concentration in MRA is designed to produce resource assessment scientists who can introduce relevant ecosystem-level variables into the traditional, single-species assessment process, complementing and enhancing the development of the science-based management policies that protect living marine resources. The MRA curriculum will prepare students for employment in academia, the environmental consulting industry, and government. In the US, government employment opportunities exist in six National Marine Fisheries Service Science Centers, on five regional Fishery Management Councils, on two interstate Marine Fisheries Commissions, and at a large number of state marine fisheries management agencies.

Enrollment in the MRA Program as increased steadily since it was developed in 2011.

Statistics: 18 females, 9 males

 

Meet the MRA Faculty

Ernst Peebles, Director of MRA Program

Ernst Peebles, Director of MRA Program

Research: Coastal resource and habitat quality; predator/prey interaction; isotope chemistry 

Most students in Dr. Peebles lab are in the Marine Resource Assessment program and are collectively pursuing a diversity of methods that apply to living resource biology and management. The common thread is coastal fish and shellfish habitat use and quality. His team’s research focus has been spatio-temporal interactions between coastal fishes and their prey, particularly as these are affected by freshwater flows to the coast and other physical processes. Personnel from his lab have quantified estuarine ichthyoplankton and invertebrate zooplankton responses to freshwater flows from more than 18 watersheds along Florida's west coast; these results have been used to manage environmental flows. The same type of plankton data is being used to develop community-level metrics for establishing the extent of eutrophication in coastal water bodies. We also use stable isotopes to contrast fish isotopic signatures with geographic background maps (isoscapes), which allows us to identify site fidelities and movements that determine geographic habitat connectivity. Recently, we added DNA barcoding and hydrodynamic models to our effort to characterize habitat connectivity during egg and larval stages. In a related effort, we have been using otolith microchemistry (LA-ICP-MS) to connect adult fish to the geographic regions they used as nursery habitat and to detect exposure of individual fish to stressful events such as oil spills.

Ernst Peebles, Director of MRA Program

Steven A. Murawski

Research: Population dynamics of exploited marine species; impacts of fishing and other anthropogenic stresses on marine ecosystems; ecosystem modeling and analysis

Dr. Murawski is a fisheries biologist and marine ecologist involved in understanding the impacts of human activities on the sustainability of ocean ecosystems. He has developed approaches for understanding the impacts of fishing on marine fish complexes exploited in mixed-species aggregations. Additionally, his work on impacts of marine protected areas and other management options has formed the scientific basis for regulation. Such assessments can help inform investments to rebuild the Gulf of Mexico from effects of the oil spill, loss of juvenile nursery areas, nutrient enrichment, overfishing and other factors. 

Cameron Ainsworth

Cameron Ainsworth

Research: Impacts of climate change on marine resources; ecosystem modeling from oil spill effects; fisheries management

Dr. Ainsworth studies the effects of changing water temperatures, ocean acidification, and other environmental factors. His research suggests that the effects of climate change are clearly noticeable in terms of biodiversity loss, loss of coral reefs, and increased extinction risk in the most vulnerable species. One of his primary foci since 2011 has been to study the effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil on marine life. His study works to tease apart the numerous effects of the oil in the ecosystem including effects on plankton, increases in fish diseases, and disrupted migration patterns for mammals and fish. Dr. Ainsworth hopes to understand how scientists can manage ecosystems to protect biodiversity by designating marine protected areas: spatial fishery closures meant to protect essential marine habitats and breeding populations of species. In addition to marine protected areas, he looks at other options for fisheries management such as the use of quotas and harvest control rules in reducing overexploitation of fish stocks.

Chris Stallings

Chris Stallings

Research: Ecology; Marine conservation and management efforts

Research in Dr. Stallings' lab focuses on basic concepts in ecology, yet includes a strong applied component to inform marine conservation and management efforts. Overarching efforts seek to estimate the abundance of marine organisms and examine the ecological processes that drive population and community dynamics. His lab's questions are often framed to evaluate the effects of human activities, such as fishing and coastal development, on ecological systems. Therefore, much of the research is field-intensive and involves both experimental and large-scale observational approaches. However, the lab also incorporates an extensive laboratory component through mesocosm experiments and use of stable isotope analysis. Moreover, the Stallings Lab explores large datasets, using multivariate statistics and GIS to reveal broad-scale ecological patterns that may be further explored through focused regional field studies.

 

REQUIRED COURSES FOR THE MRA CONCENTRATION IN ADDITION TO THE GENERAL MARINE SCIENCE DEGREE

 

Population Dynamics

This course provides instruction in population modeling as applied to fishery resources. Population dynamics synthesizes information on life history, fishery monitoring and resource surveys using mathematical models. Results are used to determine stock size and fishery sustainability and evaluate consequences of alternative fishery management actions.

 

Dynamics of Marine Ecosystems

Trophic Level Graph

Knowledge of physical-biological processes in the ocean is essential to (1) achieve a fundamental understanding of marine ecosystems dynamics and ecosystem function, (2) improve our ability to predict how ecosystems will respond to anthropogenic perturbations and climate variability, and (3) improve our ability to manage and conserve marine resources. The objective of this course is to examine a broad range of topics related to understanding how bottom-up (physical processes) and top-down (predation) processes influence marine ecosystem dynamics.

Aquarium Laboratory

 

Applied Multivariate Statistics

The focus of this course is hands-on analysis of large, high-dimensional marine ecological and environmental data sets using a suite of distribution-free methods. Students actively participate in employing techniques ideally suited for the analysis of real-world data, which are often non-normal, highly skewed, and zero-inflated. While many of the methods discussed are particularly relevant to the analysis of, say, species assemblages, microchemical signatures, or biotic/abiotic relationships, the concepts presented in this class should be applicable to a wide variety of disciplines.

 

Fish Biology

This course introduces students to the taxonomy, evolution, anatomy, sensory ecology, physiology, behavior, habitat use, reproduction, larval dynamics and ecology of fishes.

POTENTIAL ELECTIVES FOR THE MRA CONCENTRATION IN ADDITION TO THE GENERAL MARINE SCIENCE DEGREE

 

Biometry

This course covers core concepts of statistical analysis of univariate data with examples drawn from biological and ecological datasets. Since the focus is on distribution-free methods of correlation, ANOVA, and regression analysis, this class serves as an appropriate prerequisite for the College's more advanced class in Applied Multivariate Statistics. My goal is to help students develop a solid foundation in designing experiments, applying appropriate methods, and interpreting their results.

 

Marine Aquaculture

Marine Aquaculture is a 3 credit on-line course that explores issues and technologies involved in farming animals and plants in the marine aquatic environment to produce seafood for human consumption and to enhance or restore declining wild fish, shellfish and plant stocks. An overview of marine species (fish, shrimp, oyster and seaweed), production systems (ponds, cages, tanks, recirculating aquaculture), and the interactions between aquaculture and the marine environment will be addressed. The course will consist of lectures, presentations and discussions of peer-reviewed literature, science-news discussions and a paper reviewing your favorite aquaculture species or system. Students in need of academic accommodations for a disability may consult with Students with Disabilities Services to arrange appropriate accommodations. Students are required to give reasonable notice prior to requesting an accommodation.

 

Ecosystem Modeling

This course will introduce students to the Ecopath with Ecosim (EwE) suite of modelling tools. Students will develop a model, access the EwE wiki and Fishbase.org, apply empirical formulae to generate input parameters, balance Ecopath and tune Ecosim model dynamics. Students will learn specialized routines such as the optimal policy search, network analysis, Ecotracer, Ecospace, production anomaly search, equilibrium analysis and Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis. Other topics include ecosystem modeling theory and examples from other modeling systems.

Meet our Students

 

For More Information

Please visit the following link for information about our Marine Resource Assessment research and for instructions on how to apply to our Master's or PhD program.

Last modified on Wednesday, 21 March 2018 13:52

Masters Degree Requirements

The following are the minimum requirements necessary to graduate from the University of South Florida with a degree in Marine Science.

Concentrations are available in:

Biological Oceanography

Chemical Oceanography

Geological Oceanography

Physical Oceanography

Marine Resource Assessment

 

Master of Science (M.S) in Marine Science

(Biological, Chemical, Geological, and Physical Concentrations)

  1. 32 semester hours of course work (course catalog)
  • 12 core class credits - 4 core classes, 3 credit hours per class (Physical, Chemical, Biological and Geological Oceanography). A grade of "B-" or better in each of the core classes is required.
  • 8 elective formal class credits
  • 6 elective credits
  • 6 thesis credits (OCE 6971)

     2.  A written thesis and successful oral defense

 

Marine Resource Assessment Concentration

  1. 32 semester hours of course work (course catalog)
  • 12 core class credits - 4 core classes, 3 credit hours per class (Physical, Chemical, Biological and Geological Oceanography). A grade of "B-" or better in each of the core classes is required.
  • 9 MRA concentration credits - 3 of the 4 MRA courses (Population Dynamics, Fish Biology, Dynamics of Marine Ecosystems, Applied Multivariate Statistics)
  • 5 elective credits
  • 6 thesis credits (OCE 6971)

     2.  A written thesis and successful oral defense

  • Thesis/dissertation topic selection: 1) must be science-based 2) should have an application to marine resource management or policy development 3) should not directly make management or policy recommendations 4) should be identified near the onset of graduate work 5) should address priorities identified by marine resource management agencies (Florida Fish & Wildlife Research Institute, National Marine Fisheries Service, US Geological Survey)

Refer to the Policies webpage for a detailed Master's Program Checklist.

 

These requirements complement the USF Graduate School requirements stated in the graduate catalog. Prospective students may obtain general university information visiting the USF website and the USF Graduate School website.

 

Graduate Certificate

Graduate Certificate

Last modified on Wednesday, 21 March 2018 17:24