Geological Oceanography

Alastair Graham
Alastair Graham

Associate Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., Imperial College London (University of London), 2007
Office Phone: 727.553.3415
Email: alastairg@usf.edu
Google scholar page

Research: Past changes in Earth’s cryosphere, Geomorphological Processes in Sub-Ice and Open-Ocean Sea-Floor Environments, Antarctic Continental Margin Evolution, Sub-Antarctic Climate History.

Dr. Graham is a marine scientist, studying the link between ice sheets and the geological record. His research interests are focused on uncovering the histories, mechanisms, and drivers of past glacial and environmental change as recorded by high-latitude ocean floors and marine sedimentary records, as well as improving knowledge of the physical processes that govern the evolution of glacial and marine environments. Working from the glacier front to the deep sea, Dr Graham’s current research agenda is motivated by a set of questions steered towards the grand challenges faced by environmental and Antarctic science in the 21st century: how quickly, by how much, through what processes, and in response to what triggers do ice sheets and glaciers change over timescales not captured by observational records? An ongoing major objective of his work is to produce records of past ice‐sheet change at the poles that are significantly longer than satellite observations, providing the critical centennial to millennial context for changes to our warming planet and rising seas. Another key aspect is to study the processes of glacial environments using geophysical and geological tools to provide insight into modern and future ice-sheet behaviour. Dr Graham works routinely with glaciologists, oceanographers, and biologists to connect modern and palaeo processes in ice-sheet settings and increasingly looks to bridge ancient and contemporary systems in his research.

Dr. Graham received his PhD from Imperial College London in 2007. He was post-doctoral researcher at the British Antarctic Survey from 2007 through 2013, where his research emphasis shifted from seismic investigations of northwest Europe’s shallow seas, to the geomorphology of the sea bed around Antarctica for which he is now widely renowned. Dr. Graham received a NERC New Investigator Award in 2012 to study the glacial and climatic history of sub-Antarctic South Georgia. He was the 2013 recipient of the Laws Prize, awarded to young scientists for outstanding work worthy of recognition in the field of polar research. From 2013 to 2017, Dr Graham worked at the University of Exeter, in the UK, as Lecturer and, latterly, as Senior Lecturer. At UoE, he taught specialisms in glacial geology and ocean-floor exploration, led large undergraduate residential courses in research skills, and ran a week-long field class in glacial geology in Iceland. He received numerous teaching award nominations and awards for collaboration during his time at the university. Between 2015-2017, Dr Graham was Co-Investigator on a NERC-IODP Phase 2 site survey project, studying the seismostratigraphic expression of ice and ocean records contained within deep-sea sediment drifts along the Antarctic Peninsula margin. He is currently member of the PI team on an NSFOPP-NERC funded project, ‘THOR: Thwaites Offshore Research’, working as part of a 5-year Joint Research Program (the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration) studying the future evolution of Thwaites Glacier in West Antarctica. Dr Graham currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Glaciology.

Dr. Graham became Associate Professor in Geological Oceanography at the College of Marine Science at USF in August 2019.  A new group – SESAME (Sea-floor Survey and Exploration of Southern OceAn Marine Environments) – will form around his interests in the coming years.  SESAME will serve to retain and combine Dr Graham’s diverse range of research interests and active projects into a single program, supported by a new state-of-the-art geophysical lab space set to open at USF in 2020. Innovative marine survey techniques underpin the research group’s forward-looking plans, which seek to employ autonomous and underwater vehicles to explore hard-to-reach sub-ice environments, and use high resolution sonar, seismic equipment, and sampled sediments to study sea-floor glacial environments in unprecedented detail.


 

Pamela Hallock Muller
Pamela Hallock Muller

Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1977
Office Phone: 727.553.1567
Email: pmuller@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
Reef Indicators Lab Website
Dr. Pamela Hallock Muller on Google Scholar

Research: Biological, Environmental and Evolutionary Controls on the Production and Accumulation of Carbonate Sediments: Geologic History of Reefs; Modern Coral Reefs; Shelf Ecology; Environmental Management; Micropaleontology; Paleoceanography; Paleoecology

Studies of both the geologic record and modern ecosystems provide insight not only into environments of the past and present, but also the probable effects of human activities on future tropical marine ecosystems. Foraminifera are the most abundant shelled organisms in modern oceans and have a fossil record going back more than 500 million years. They are also excellent model organisms for environmental and paleoceanographic research. Ongoing projects include: a) decadal-scale changes in reef communities of the Florida Keys, b) biology and ecology of benthic foraminifera, corals and their algal symbionts, c) development of bioindicator protocols applicable to reef environments worldwide, and d) effects of ocean acidification on calcification of benthic organisms.

Professor Hallock’s graduate students have come from backgrounds ranging from biology and geology to engineering and computer science; all with an interest in interdisciplinary research. Their work has implications across the geobiological spectrum including cell biology, algal symbiosis, coral-reef ecology, environmental management, global environmental change, evolution, paleoceanography, sedimentology, and hydrocarbon exploration.

In 2012, Dr. Hallock Muller was elected as a Fellow of the Paleontological Society. In 2013, Dr. Hallock Muller was chosen as one of the Top 25 Women Professors in Florida.


 

David F. Naar
David F. Naar

Associate Dean of Academic Affairs
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., Scripps Institution of Oceanography, 1990
Office Phone: 727.553.1637
Email: naar@usf.edu
CV: View PDF

 

 

Research: Marine Magnetics; Mid-Ocean Ridge and Hotspot Interactions; Plate Tectonics; Wax Analog Modeling of Seafloor Spreading Processes, Seafloor Mapping of Fish Habitats, Artificial Reefs, Coral Reefs, Mines, Paleoshorelines, and Hydrothermal Vents’

These research interests have been addressed with oceanographic seafloor mapping expeditions to the Gulf of Mexico, Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. Analyses of multibeam, magnetics, gravity, side-scan sonar are made in conjunction with insight from a seafloor spreading analog wax model. Ongoing projects include: Plate tectonic reconstruction of the Pacific-Nazca plates, Off-axis volcanism along the Easter Seamount Chain, and benthic habitat studies around Florida and the Bahamas. 


 

Brad E. Rosenheim
Brad E. Rosenheim

Associate Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D. University of Miami, 2005
Office Phone: 727-553-3354
Email: brosenheim@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
Rosenheim Group Website
Brad E. Rosenheim on Twitter
Southern Ocean Science Website

Research: Paleoceanography/Paleoclimate, stable isotopes, carbon cycling

Research in Brad Rosenheim’s group aims to constrain changes in climate and carbon cycling in the recent geologic past, from the anthropocene to the last glacial maximum. Researchers working with Dr. Rosenheim employ isotopic techniques including conventional stable isotope measurements (H, C, N, O), non-conventional stable isotope measurements (“clumped” isotopes in CO2 derived from carbonate minerals), and radioisotopic techniques including uranium system dating and radiocarbon analysis. Dr. Rosenheim’s group obtains geologic and oceanographic data from sediment, coral and sclerosponge skeletons, ice, and the open ocean water column. The group casts a broad approach to specific questions regarding climate and carbon cycling, resulting in success of obtaining research support from an equivalently broad section of NSF programs and other funding agencies that fund Earth Sciences.

For up-to-date laboratory activities and a list of recent publications and news, please visit the Rosenheim lab web page.


 

Amelia Shevenell
Amelia Shevenell

Associate Professor
Geological Oceanography
Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2004
Office Phone: 727.553.3372
Email: ashevenell@usf.edu
CV: View PDF
PaleoLab Website
Expedition Antarctica on Facebook
Amelia Shevenell on Twitter
Expedition Antarctica Website
Southern Ocean Science Website

 

Research: Paleoceanography/Paleoclimatology; Trace and minor elements in biogenic calcite and marine sediments; Stable isotopes in carbonate and siliceous marine microfossils; Lipid biomarkers; Sedimentology

Dr. Shevenell’s research focuses on generating high-resolution geochemical records from marine sediments to address questions related to Earth’s Cenozoic climate evolution. Her current research interests are geographically diverse (including the Southern Ocean and North Pacific Ocean) and divided into three focus areas: 1) Cenozoic Antarctic ice sheet development from far-field and ice proximal records, 2) the role of the high-latitude oceans in Glacial-Interglacial carbon cycling, and 3) Antarctic Holocene climate variability. Paleoclimate/paleoceanographic research undertaken by the Shevenell Lab is relevant to IPCC concerns that ongoing climate changes are accelerating polar ice cap melting and global sea level rise. Shevenell and her students develop, calibrate, and employ a wide variety of inorganic and organic geochemical and micropaleontologic techniques to reconstruct past changes in ocean temperature, circulation, productivity, continental ice volume, and carbon cycling on decadal to orbital timescales. This multi-proxy approach enables Shevenell, her students, and their collaborators to address the broadest range of climate and biogeochemical problems.

Dr. Shevenell is actively involved in several international research programs, including the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) and Antarctic Geologic Drilling (ANDRILL). Dr. Shevenell maintains an active sea-going research program and encourages student participation. Field research opportunities in the Shevenell Lab range in scale, but all include the retrieval of marine sediments from continental margins and/or ocean basins using oceanographic research vessels, ice breakers, drill ships, or ice-shelf drilling platforms.

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