Seminars

Seminar Schedule Fall 2019

Fridays at 3:30 PM, MSL Conference Room, (MSL 134)
Note: Some seminars are scheduled for Thursday (3:30PM, MSL 134)

August 30, 2019
Title: Faculty Seminars
Host: Chuanmin Hu
Download Faculty Seminar Series flyer

September 6, 2019
Speaker: Dr. Matthias Sieber
Affiliation: USF
Title: Cadmium and zinc cycling in the oceans: how, where and why do we care?
Host: Tim Conway

September 13, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. John Parkinson
Affiliation:
USF
Title:
Coral-algal symbioses: evolution in the Anthropocene
Abstract: Rising sea surface temperatures represent an existential threat to coral reef ecosystems. Heat stress can disrupt the beneficial partnership between corals and micro-algae, causing bleaching and death. And yet, such symbioses have persisted since the Jurassic period. Will corals and their symbionts be able to adapt quickly enough to survive modern climate change? I use a combination of field work, lab studies, and genomic techniques to address this question, with the goal of informing coral conservation and restoration efforts.
Host:
Isla Kuffner, USGS

September 20, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Zoe Pratte
Affiliation:
Georgia Tech   
Title:
From Nemo to Jaws: Understanding the Fish Microbiome
Abstract: Cartilaginous and bony fishes have extensive biodiversity, together encompassing approximately 30,000 species. Despite comprising nearly half of all vertebrate species, little is known about the microbial communities that live in and on these fishes. Collectively known as the microbiome, these communities are a critical component to host health, playing important roles in protection against pathogens, modulating nutritional intake from food, and as indicators of overall animal health.  A collaboration between Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia Aquarium, and OCEARCH has allowed the first comprehensive microbial analysis of a diverse array of bony and cartilaginous fishes. From clownfish to white sharks, certain properties of the fecal microbiome are strikingly similar, notably a consistent high abundance of Photobacterium, Fusobacterium, and Clostridia bacteria. However, key differences in community structure are also apparent.  Although the sample size remains limited, carnivorous fishes, particularly top predators such as white sharks, seem to have remarkably low microbiome diversity, with as few as 11 bacterial taxa comprising the fecal microbiome. Factors that influence microbiome structure are complex, vary among body niches (e.g., gill, skin, cloaca, feces), and include host species, diet, and life stage; environmental conditions (e.g., wild vs. captivity); and interactions with other organisms. For example, our work shows that contact with an anemone alters the skin microbiome of clownfish, and that captive eagle rays (at Georgia Aquarium) exhibit significant restructuring of both internal and external microbiomes but also retain core microbiome members shared with wild individuals. These and other findings are building a comprehensive understanding of the fish microbiome, providing critical information to help better conserve, protect, and manage the health of wild and captive fish populations.
Host: Chris Kellogg, USGS

September 27, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Julian Martin
Affiliation:
USGS
Title:
Applications of decision analysis for the conservation of coastal and marine systems.
Abstract: I will discuss the role of ecological modeling for making decisions about natural resource management in coastal and marine systems. First, I will describe the role of traditional approaches for conservation, such as population viability analyses, threat analyses and trend detection. Then I will present a more structured approach to decision making. I will consider the example of spatial conservation planning, and particularly the optimal design of protection zones for marine wildlife. I will follow up with the application of an adaptive resource management framework for dealing with sequential decisions and model uncertainty. I will also contrast the role of surveillance and targeted monitoring programs in the context of conservation and management.
Bio: Julien Martin is a researcher at the US Geological Survey’s Wetland and Aquatic Research Center and at the St Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center. His expertise includes: population ecology, ecological forecasting and the application of decision theory to natural resource management. He is a courtesy faculty at the University of South Florida and the University of Florida. Google scholar page.
Host:
USGS

October 4, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Ali Graham
Affiliation:
USF CMS
Title:
Past change in Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica: new insights from cruise NBP19-02
Host: 
Amelia Shevenell, USF CMS

October 11, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Benjamin Keisling
Affiliation:
Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory      
Title:
Using Geochemical Data to Constrain the Pleistocene Dynamics of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Host:
Imogen Browne and Amelia Shevenell, USF CMS

October 18, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Nancy Williams
Affiliation:
USF CMS
Title:
Observing the Southern Ocean carbon cycle using autonomous biogeochemical platforms
Host:
Tim Conway, USF CMS

October 24, 2019
Speaker: Dr. Masa Miyahara
Affiliation: President of the Fisheries Research and Education Association of Japan
Title: Fishery Policy Reform in Japan
Host: Steve Murawski, USF CMS

October 25, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Isabel Romero
Affiliation:
USF CMS
Title:
Organic molecular tracers of processes at depth in the Gulf of Mexico
Host:
Amelia Shevenell, USF CMS

November 1, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Phoebe Lam
Affiliation:
UC Santa Cruz 
Title:
Unexpected iron cycling at the Peru Margin
Host:
Tim Conway, USF CMS
Abstract: The GP16 Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect cruise from Peru to Tahiti in 2013 along 12-15°S crossed the large eastern tropical South Pacific oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) in the eastern half of the transect, which was expected to be an important source of dissolved iron into the ocean interior.  Contrary to expectations, there was no significant iron plume in the heart of the ODZ around 250 m that extended beyond the coastal margin, despite the ODZ penetrating several thousand of kilometers into the interior.  Surprisingly, a deep coastal iron plume in oxygenated waters centered around 2000 m was observed to penetrate >1000 km into the interior. In this talk, we examine the reasons behind the unexpected high Fe from the oxygenated deep slope relative to the more reducing ODZ above. 

November 8, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Colleen Burge
Affiliation:
University of Maryland   
Title:
Gone viral, the global emergence of an oyster-killing virus and its potential impacts on the US shellfish industry
Host: 
Mya Breitbart, USF CMS

November 15, 2019
Speaker:
Dr. Jun Zhang
Affiliation:
U. Miami/NOAA  
Title:
Evaluating and Improving Hurricane Model Physics using Aircraft Observations in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer
Abstract: The atmospheric boundary layer is a critical region for hurricane development and intensification, because it regulates the energy distribution and spin-up dynamics of a hurricane.  However, the hurricane boundary layer is the least observed part of a storm until now. This talk presents in-situ aircraft observations of mean and turbulence structure of the hurricane boundary layer, including boundary-layer height scales, inflow strength, and turbulent fluxes.  These aircraft data have been used to evaluate and improve the model physics in the operational Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model, leading to substantial improvement in hurricane intensity forecast. This study emphasizes the important role of turbulent mixing in governing the inflow structure, distribution of deep convection and the hurricane intensity.
Host: Dennis Mayer, USF CMS

November 22, 2019
Speaker
: Dr. Shannon Klotsko
Affiliation:
UNC Willmington   
Title:
Deglacial stratigraphy of the Beaufort Margin sediments, Arctic Ocean
Abstract: The Arctic Ocean is rapidly changing in response to warming climate. For insight into environmental response to climate change, we typically examine periods of rapid change in the past. However, the Arctic is a hard place to study due to the seasonal sea ice and minimal development along the coast, leading to a lack of data when compared to other ocean basins. We aim to fill in some of these knowledge gaps by examining the Wisconsin deglacial history of the Beaufort Margin in the western Arctic. In 2013, we conducted a cruise on the USCGC Healy to collect high-resolution seismic reflection data, multibeam bathymetry data, and sediment cores to examine the deglacial sediment dispersal patterns for the region. The data indicate that the western margin, from Barrow Canyon to the Mackenzie Trough, is characterized by thick Holocene sediments mostly sourced from Barrow Canyon and continental discharge. The eastern Beaufort, from the Mackenzie Trough to the Amundsen Gulf, is dominated by event deposits. These include ice rafting events from the Amundsen Gulf ice stream and glacial lake discharge events that entered the Arctic via the Mackenzie. One of these discharge events coincides with the onset of the Younger Dryas cold period and could be discharge from glacial Lake Agassiz. In this talk, I will elaborate on the significance of this finding and the overall sediment dispersal patterns for the margin.
Host: Jen Miselis, USGS

December 6, 2019
Speaker
: Dr. Patrick Sullivan
Affiliation:
Cornell University     
Title:
The effect of ocean environmental conditions on the distribution of summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus):  Spatio-temporal modelling comparisons using R-INLA.
Abstract: The spatial distribution of summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) relative abundance changes over time with changes in environmental covariates, such as bottom depth, bottom salinity, bottom temperature and sea surface temperature (SST). A range of conditional autoregressive (CAR) models were explored using the R-INLA frame work, while accounting for random effects arising from over dispersion as well as spatio-temporal autocorrelation. Summer flounder relative abundance data is estimated over an irregular lattice of survey strata. Alternative model assumptions applied to survey observations taken during the fall and spring are explored. Relative abundance data and associated oceanographic covariates were collected during NMFS fall and spring bottom trawl surveys. Results indicate that the distribution of summer flounder stock is correlated with a regional climate-driven changes in both bottom temperature as well as sea surface temperature depending on season. An analysis of 1991-2014 NMFS survey data suggests that a 1°C increase in SST during the fall season can increase relative abundance by about 11%, whereas in the spring a 1°C increase in SST can increase relative abundance by 34% even after accounting for over-dispersion and spatio-temporal autocorrelation. Model performance was improved by allowing for the estimation of the spatial autocorrelation parameter rho and including a second-order random walk in time. The R-INLA package provides a flexible platform for hierarchical Bayesian spatial and temporal modeling.
Host: Alex Illich, Steve Murawski, USF CMS

December 13, 2019
Speaker
: Dr. Sean Lucey
Affiliation:
NOAA    
Title:
TBD
Host:
Cam Ainsworth, USF CMS

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